Status Tab

Index

The status tab allows you to monitor the level activity. The status information may be somewhat helpful in troubleshooting problems. The display is updated ever 2 seconds.

Current Connections:

This number indicates how many peers you are currently connected to. If this number is zero, then you aren't connected to anyone and you won't be able to share files. If the number of known peers is large, then you might be having issues with connectivity such as a firewall blocking the program. If the number of known peers is very small, you may not be connected because the few peers you know about are not currently active.

Known Peers:

This number indicates how many peers your computer currently knows about. Bunzilla maintains a database of other computers it knows is running the software. When you launch bunzilla, it goes thru the known peer list trying to find someone to connect to and start the sharing process. Once you are connected to one or more peers, those peers will share their list of known peers. So, once you get connected, the database will grow and your ability to stay connected to the network will improve. Future releases of this software will ship with updated peer lists. For this intial release, find your own peers and add them manually.

Current Requests:

Every time you upload, download or search for a file, a new request is created to fullfill the activity. In addition, requests that other people make on their computers are passed to the peers they are connected with for processing (eg. your download is their upload). This number represents the number of requests your computer is currently trying to fullfill.

Current Tasks:

Each request will be fullfilled by creating one or more tasks and assigning those tasks to the peers you are connected to. If you are connected to 5 peers and request a file download, the program might download the entire file from one peer, or it might download 5 sections of the file from each of the peers and then reassemble the file into a single file. The task count represents the current number of individual peer activities going on to complete all of the requests.

Bytes Recieved:

The number of bytes your computer received during the last second. Note this number is bytes, not bits. You can limit the number of bytes received using the Network tab on the configuration screen.

Bytes Transmitted:

The number of bytes your computer sent during the last second. Note this number is bytes, not bits. You can limit the number of bytes sent using the Network tab on the configuration screen.

Send Que:

This represents the number of tasks that are waiting to send data. Ideally, the send queue should be small. A large number indicates either you have limited the transmit speed, the speed of your internet connection for tranmsitting is being reached, or the peers you are interacting with have hit the limit of their download speed. If you have limited your trasmission speed and this number is large, you may be able to increase your performance by removing or increasing that limit using the Network tab on the configuration screen.

Receive Que:

This represents the number of tasks that have received data which are not yet processed. Ideally, the receive queue should be small. A large number indicates your system is probably reaching some resource limit such as cpu or disk i/o, etc.

Inbound Connections:

The number of requested new connections received during the last second.

Outbound Connections:

The number of peers your computer tried to connect to during the last second.

Known Remote Docs:

A privacy feature of Bunzilla is to not keep a centralized list of documents that people are sharing One of the ways Bunzilla improves search performance is to keep a list of known files that have recently passed thru your system as a result of a search or download. This list represents the number of known documents.

Sleep Cycles:

When Bunzilla has nothing else to do, it will put itself to sleep for a while. This number varies greatly from machine to machine based on the type and speed of the processor in your computer. If the sleep cycle number is consistently a very low number, your computer may be at its CPU limit.

Busy Level:

Busy level is a metric of how active it has been over the last monitor inverval. Values should range between 0 and 100. Bunzilla uses this estimate to determine when to your system is not being heavily utilzed. When you are inactive, the program will try to offload tasks from busier systems to your system.